July 2005

Date Event

01/07/2005

2hrs

Front Wing Stays

Boot Slam Panel

The painting of the front wing stays is finished and dry.  I fitted them this afternoon making sure they were in alignment with the doors.  I went back to the fitting of the boot slam panel. I had clamped the panel in place and closed the boot. All seemed well the seal was butted against he boot lid. Then I realised that there was enough flex in the panel to push it back when the lid was closed and make it appear as though it was a good fit.  If I held the panel to stop it flexing the boot lid would not close properly.  I spoke to Nostalgia to get an understanding of how they fitted the slam panel. They fit the boot /panel seal across the width of the boot opening and in to the body cavity, (as I had done).  From inside the car they push the slam panel rearwards until it the seal touches the boot lid and clamp it in place.  If the front of he slam panel is not in line ( and it often isn't ) they trim thee slam panel to fit.  I trial fitted mine and found that I needed to trim some more out of the corners to clear the welds of the dumb iron chassis brackets.  After a further trial fit I clamped he panel in place but I need to adjust the position of the slam panel to make the seal come in contact  with he boot across the whole width.  I left this until tomorrow when I will determine the final position and trim it. Yesterday I obtained some M5 rivnuts. Today I fitted them to the bottom of the boot well coming to secure the floor.  Fitting the rivnuts means that the floor can be fixed in place from above by one person.

 

02/07/2005

2hrs

boot slam Panel

From inside the boot opening I  positioned the boot slam panel in place and clamped it with a "G" clamp and a couple of mole grips. with the seal tight against the boot lid the slam panel was at an angle across the car. I thought this would look odd when the boot is open and finally trimmed/.  I adjusted the position of the slam panel so that it was square with the cross member in the belief that the position of the seal was not critical as long as it was in decent contact with the boot lid.  It also looked as though the position of the  seal could be adjusted slightly when attaching the lower part of he slam panel to the boot well   I decided to fix it in place with 2 x M4 countersunk screws and rivnuts in the cross member.  Before drilling the slam panel I took some time to read again the fitting instructions fro the slam pane, the boot well and the boot lock.  When fitting anything that is long, like the boot well and the slam panel, the tendency is to drill and fix the centre and work outwards ensuring the pattern and distances between fastenings is the same for each side, and the number of fastenings holds the parts firmly and flat In this case you cant do that because there needs to be a slot in the centre of the slam panel fro the boot lock catch.  However I was able to work out the probable placing of the fasteners when it is time fit he boot well.  Returning to the slam panel still clamped in position I  marked the position of the temporary fixings holes on the centreline of the cross member and  2" in from the end drilled a pilot hole through the slam panel and cross member. I opened up the holes in the cross member to accept M4 Rivnuts and fitted them. The holes in the slam panel were opened out fro M4 screws and countersunk .  The Slam panel was fixed in place.
 

02/07/2005

6hrs

Boot Well

Boot

Rear Body

I began by investigating how to get the boot well in position to fix it.  It will not go in through the boot lid opening so it must be fitted from underneath. It appears not to be and easy job even from that direction.  I had an idea this was going to be difficult because Keith Wells had said to me at the Gaydon Meeting that he wished he had fitted  the boot well, before he had fitted the rear of the body. Likewise Nostalgia let slip last week that they sometimes fit the boot well and slam panel before fitting the rear of the body..... I don't have that luxury so I have to find a way.  I had left and extra long  length of copper fuel line because I was unsure exactly where the fuel connections would come.  It was getting in the way of fitting the boot well so I trimmed it so that it was above and aft of the rear axel. There is still plenty left on the premise that it is easier to cut it off if it is too long, but much more difficult to stick it on if it is too short.  I decided to remove the boot lid to make it easier.  I was dissatisfied with the hinge positions and their operation anyway. I was also concerned that the hinge bridge was still flexing even though I had fitted the hinge stays.  So whilst I was about it I removed the stays and the bridge.  I could see that the hinge pivot had lots of sideways play in it. I dismantled the hinge greased all the parts and refitted the pivot with two washers as shims, either side of the hinge arm to remove the side play.  I'm contemplating making more sturdier wing stays to combat the flex in he hinge bridge.  Whilst I was at this stage I decided to replace the rear wing fixing nuts. I had temporarily fitted the wings using plain nuts in case I needed to remove them for any reason during the assembly process. I replaced each nut in turn with a nyloc nut ensuring it was tight when I finished.   I haven't quite finished yet and will continue tomorrow.  In my mind I have determined that the problem I have with fitting the boot well is that I have the car on its wheels and cannot get a steep enough angle to feed the boot well up past the diff and far enough back to fit over the slam panel. When I have finished with the boot hinge bridge and the wing fixings I will jack the car up in to axel stands and see how it goes.
 

04/07/2005

2hrs
Rear Dumb Irons

 

I'm just about back to where I was yesterday lunchtime. I've finished replacing the wing / body attachment nuts with nyloc nuts. I n the process I have removed the R.H. rear bumper and dumb iron. I have trimmed the thickness of the GRP around the hole for the dumb iron grommet. and reassembled the whole thing.  I have refitted the boot bridge.
 

05/07/2005

3hrs

Boot Well

I Jacked the rear of the car up and placed it on axel stands to give me plenty of room under the car.  After a couple of  half hearted attempts it was obvious that the boot well was not going to fit.  A phone call to Nostalgia revealed the secret. If the body is fitted then cut the back of he boot well in half. Then you can squeeze in the sides and overlap the back as necessary to get it to fit.  Once fitted, the back of the boot well is held together by an aluminium plate, countersunk screws and nuts.   I began by making the plate out of 18 gauge aluminium approx 3" wide by 8" long.  This was mounted at the centre of the rear of the boot well and temporarily secured with 6 x M5 countersunk, stainless screws and nuts. Once secured he bottom of the bracket was bent around the boot well, under where the floor will fit, and clamped in to place. 2 more 5mm holes were drilled  through the plate in line with the floor fixing holes. The bottom of the plate was then secured with 2 more M5 countersunk screws and nuts.  the plate was then marked for trimming in line with the floor opening.  I would definitely recommend  the fitting of the boot well (even if not secured ) before fitting the rear body section. 
 

06/07/2005

3 hrs

Boot Well

I removed the plate and cut the rear of the boot well in half.  I fitted the plate with M5 rivnuts  the Rivnuts I have are a bit long so I backed them with a washer. Fitting the boot well in place is now easy. You van squeeze the sides in and overlap the back feed it up from underneath and expand it once it is clear of the chassis and then drop it in place.  I lifted the boot well up an forward and refitted the plate I fitted the slam panel making sure it was underneath the boot well rear lip.  At this point I realised I should not have fitted the bottom rivnuts because they interfere the underneath of the slam panel that comes in contact with the boot well.  I took the plate off and drilled out the bottom rivnuts. I've decided to keep the bottom of the bracket in place ( though it is not really necessary) as extra support for the boot well.  I took some time to look at the fitting of the boot well to make sure I knew the optimum position in relation to the fuel tank, fuel pipes and the chassis. I took the boot well out again and cut a little out of the rear of the side flanges to clear the welds for the dumb iron transition brackets.  I refitted the boot well, making sure it was pulled well to the rear and marked the fixing points  across the chassis. Two points to note.  Make sure there is sufficient space at the centre of the rear cross member free from screw fixings for the boot catch slot. Also make sure the fixings across the slam panel avoid the fixing screws for the slam panel.  With the fixing points marked, I carefully drilled the boot well flange, slam panel and cross member to accept M5 spire bolts as a temporary fix whilst I work on fixing the sides of the boot well to the chassis.
 

10/07/2005

6hrs

Boot Well

 

Fuel Pump

 

Before fixing the sides of the boot well it is preferable to fit the top cover. This presents the next challenges where and how to locate the inlet from the fuel tank and the outlet from the fuel filter to the pipe work running down the chassis.  The inlet from the fuel tank comes in to the top of the top cover.  The build manual pretty well leaves you to make up your own mind on where the components and the pipes of the fuel system are located.  However the first given is that the top cover has to fitted.  This was fitted earlier, external to the car, but  is not the exact same shape as the boot well and is pulled in to place and shape during the tightening of the bolts.  In the car. you can only get an approximate position of the tank outlet but this has to suffice.  Drill a pilot hole and then open out the hole until the pipe passes through the top. Starting at the centre insert and  loosely screw up the securing screws, gradually working outwards.  As you do this the top cover will be pulled in to position and it will be necessary to adjust the position of the hole in the top cover the pipe passes through.   With the securing bolts fully tightened the position of my pipe ended up centred on 35mm from the front and 230mm from the R.H. side ( all measurements are approximate and  measured from inside the boot well).  I took the top cover off again and opened out the hole to accept a grommet and refitted the top cover.    Now it is along time since I took the fuel pump, fuel filter and associated components out of the XJ6 that i had forgotten much of he detail. However the Haynes XJ6 manual and the photographs I took of the dismantling process came ot the rescue, The only guidance the build manual gives is that components fit under the top cover and on the front RH of the boot well. (Logical since this is where the inlet pipe is and the outlet pipe will be. The only other pieces of information on the installation is that the fuel filter is mounted below the fuel pump, the XJ6 mounting brackets can be used and they components can be mounted on a sub plate with standoffs.   I spent some time reading the Haynes manual and modifying the fuel injection system diagram to reflect the classic 120 installation.  Fuel injection installations have a fuel rail, mounted on the engine, and a supply and return pipe from  and to the fuel tank.  I did not save the non return valves, in the return line of the XJ6. I don't think they are necessary on the Classic 120 since the return enters the top of the tank.  The XJ6 fuel tank changeover switch is not required .  There is a non return valve and air bleeding manifold between the fuel pump and the fuel filter.  I believe this is an anti flooding device and is probably best fitted in the Classic 120.   I stripped the pipe work off of the fuel pump and the fuel filter.  the fuel filter has a triangular shaped bracket, fitted with a rubber foot, welded to it. This needs to be cut off at the top close to the weld  At the bottom weld the bracket is bent down to form and additional supporting bracket The rubber foot and surplus metal can be cut off.   The additional metal bracket with the securing nuts can be removed and discarded from the fuel pump bracket.  What you end up with is two brackets that hold  the fuel pump and filter at an upward angle (to assist flow and prevention of air locks ) which can be mounted on a flat panel. Initial measurements and trial fitting show that the fuel pump and filter can be mounted on an aluminium plate approx 8" x 4".  The Fuel pump is surrounded by foam rubber ( as an anti vibration mount) and clamped in a cylindrical mounting. My pump was showing signs  of tiredness in that the rubber was not tight and the pump could move about.  I fixed this by placing an extra layer of close cell foam around the foam bonded to the pump and refitting the bracket.  The pump is once again secure but still protected from vibration .

11/07/2005

2hrs

Fuel System

I mounted the fuel filter and the fuel pump on the plate using M6 x 20mm & rivnuts. I was exploring position of the pipe work in relation to the plate and the mounting of the plate within  the boot to get the neatest installation, when I decided to call Nostalgia and ask a couple of questions.  Lucky I did, because Nostalgia no longer mount the fuel pump and filter in the boot but on the outside of the boot well in the RH rear wing space. Nostalgia also do not fit the air bleed manifold. In some ways this makes life simpler since the majority of he pipe work is now routed outside the boot well. Luckily my mounting plate will fit in the new position without alteration. I will need to make some standoffs to allow for the rivnuts.  All the components and pipe work need to be within the bottom line of the boot floor. (i.e. Nothing hanging down.).  I've yet to make up my mind about tank outlet which protrudes in to the boot.  I am going to investigate if it is possible to bend it such that there is no pipe work within the boot.
 

13/07/2005

4hrs

Fuel System

I've made some 15mm standoffs for the plate. After lots of trial fitting, to get the position right, I've drilled the RH side of the boot well to match the plate. I've made 4 mounting studs for the plate,  using M6 countersunk screws, a countersunk penny washer, plain penny washer, to sandwich the fibreglass, secured with a plain nut. I fitted the standoffs over the studs, followed by the plate and secured the assembly with plain washers, spring washers and plain nuts.  I've obtained a disposable type pre-filter for the line between the tank and the  pump. I now have to work out how to mount it, securely.  I have been working on using braided fuel hose for the installation.  It does not look possible to bend the outlet of the tank , which means I will have to use the entry in to the boot top cover I made earlier and have a short length of pipe exiting the boot well to the fuel pre-filter.  I've not decided on the route yet or how to attach it to the tank. It may be possible to use a compression fitting and screw connection. I'd be happier with a metal pipe in the boot as it is less likely to get damaged. I'm also toying with the idea of using  a length of copper tube secured under the tank support as the feed to the pre-filter and then change to braided hose once it is in the vicinity of  pre-filter rather than run braided hose all the way.  However I'm conscious of the fact that the more joints there are the more chance of a leak there is.  Overall I'm looking for a neat, tidy and safe installation. 
 

Total hours this month = 30 hrs

 

Total  hours to date = 1160  hrs